Dump this Dump 2

Updated information also available on their website:  http://www.dumpthisdump2.ca/dtd2LOGO

 

Contact, via email: dumpthisdump2@gmail.com

Updated information:  as of June 2014 (French text is below)

Welcome-to-OttawaWhen you now drive in to Ottawa on the 417, one can now see a large banner between the Vars and Boundary Road exits which clearly states the mind of the Dump the Dump 2 group and residents of the Carlsbad Springs, Edwards and Vars area (see attached photo).

On Wednesday, June 25, Taggart-Miller presented its draft environmental assessment for a 450 acres landfill to residents of the Carlsbad Springs, Edwards and Vars area.  This site, which will be four times the size of the Carp landfill, will accept industrial, commercial and institutional waste (IC&I) as well construction and demolition (C&D) including contaminated soil – not quite your household residential curbside garbage.

Members of  « Dump this Dump 2 » (DTD2) are still trying to understand why the provincial Ministry of the Environment and Climatic Change would even envisage to approve such a project since there is already sufficient capacity in the Ottawa region.  Interestingly enough, two recycling centres, within close proximity of the proposed site, will be able to take in the same amount of waste as Taggart-Miller is proposing to take in, and, these two centres will also be able to handle the excess landfill waste.  So, there is no reason to establish another landfill.  What Taggart-Miller is proposing is NOT unique or innovative!

The irony that lies behind this project is that the soil on which Taggart-Miller proposes to build its landfill was considered and rejected twice before for two different projects.  The basis for the rejection was the composition of the soil – the softness of the deep, wet Leda clay soil makes the site unstable for a large weighty structure, like a landfill.  It becomes especially vulnerable during seismic events, which poses a significant risk issue in this part of the province.  Ironically, this is not a criteria considered by the Ministry of the Environment when reviewing and approving new landfill requests.

DTD2 will now contact and pressure their provincial MPPs – Grant Crack, MPP of Glengarry-Prescott-Russell, riding where the proposed site will be located, Lisa MacLeod, MPP Nepean-Carleton and Marie-France Lalonde, MPP of Ottawa-Orleans – to better inform the Honourable Glen R. Murray, Minister of the Environment and Climatic Change.

Below is the community rally that was organized during the June 25 Taggart-Miller Open House at the Carlsbad Springs Community Centre inside the gym:

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Residents send clear message at dump open house– Image 1

Residents send clear message at dump open house

Brier Dodge, Metroland

Don Bedard, centre, speaks to Carlsbad Springs residents, many of whom are part of the Dump This Dump group, before the Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre open house on June 25.
From:  Ottawa East News By Brier Dodge

Carlsbad Springs residents sent a clear message on June 25 at the sixth open house for the Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre in Carlsbad Springs.

“Dump this dump,” they chanted, as they followed in behind one another, circling the centre tables of the open house for about five minutes.

The residents are part of a group called Dump This Dump and are opposing the proposed CRRRC on Boundary Road.

“I think we made the message very clear, Mr. Taggart,” said Lucie Regimbald, a member of the Dump This Dump group to a packed room.

Before residents entered the meeting, they rallied in the Carlsbad Springs Community Centre’s parking lot, and prepared co-ordinated efforts. Many members were decked out in Dump This Dump hats or tshirts.

“Make sure they know the way we feel,” said Don Bedard to the group of residents before they entered. “We don’t want this…!”

Taggart Miller has long defended the proposed centre, and said there will be minimal impacts to the community. Representatives have said they plan to divert as much waste as possible into recycling methods, though the community has questioned the exact percentage. Only 12 per cent is required to be diverted under provincial standard, but Taggart Miller representatives have said they hope to be able to divert a higher percentage of waste.

The proposed centre – called the CRRRC for short, but “the dump” by residents” – is for industrial and commercial waste.

Hubert Bourque, the project manager for Taggart Miller, said he hoped residents would take the time to read through the draft environmental assessment notes that were presented at the open house on boards.

“For most people, it’s onerous to review a document like this,” he said.

Much of the feedback received so far has been generic opposition to the project, rather than feedback on elements

of the proposed assessment, he said.

“We’ve summarized information we’ve found,” Bourque said As the project evolves and we better definite it, we expect the level of opposition to diminish,”.

Dump This Dump president Sue Langlois said the group is still strongly opposed.

“We’re completely opposed, we have not wavered,” she said. “What we’re trying to get out there is there is no need for this toxic, risky project. You’ll see the community is out here in great support.”

The draft EA is a very lengthy and technical document. That’s part of the reason the city gave the Dump This Dump group $50,000 to hire outside experts, said Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais. Blais said the city will provide its own technical feedback near the end of July.

“I think this is a crazy proposal for this area,” Blais said. “The city provided very detailed concerns about a year ago that were largely ignored by the province.”

Blais said residents face an additional challenge because

the small area is represented by three different MPPs – with residents in the ridings of Ottawa-Orléans, Nepean-Carleton and Glengarry-Prescott-Russell.

“Their voice is diminished in a small way,” he said.

Residents were invited to leave feedback on the presentation at the open house, which is also available online atwww.crrrc.ca. Taggart Miller has put much of the information and notice about open houses on the website

dedicated to the project.

One feedback formed left out on the table summed up the residents’ general consensus well, with only two word written on it, in large, block letters.

“NO DUMP.”

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Blais protests recycling/landfill project
Cumberland councillor Stephen Blais is dead set against a proposed industrial and commercial waste recycling and landfill project in his ward.Blais joined a march of residents from the communities of Carlsbad Springs, Vars, and Edwards during a Wednesday evening open house at the Carlsbad Springs Community Centre on the Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre project.“This is not the right proposal for Carlsbad Springs,” said Blais.

The Ottawa-based Taggart-Miller group of companies is in the midst of an environmental assessment review of its recycling centre proposal as part of an application to the provincial environment ministry for permission to go ahead with construction on the $60 million project. Ottawa council has gathered its own research group together on the issue.

“We have put together a team of experts in the city,” said Blais, “experts in everything from waste management to biodiversity to economic development to social demographics to traffic. You name the expert and we’ve got it, looking at the documents, and the city will be providing fulsome comment to the Ministry of Environment later this summer.”

Blais expressed disappointment that ministry officials have not given serious weight so far to Ottawa’s concerns and criticisms about the project. But he hopes for a change with Glen Murray’s appointment as environment minister in the new majority Liberal cabinet.

“We have a new minister of the environment as of two days ago, and I hope that the new minister, Mr. Murray, is more open to hearing what the City of Ottawa and the people of Ottawa have to say about these kinds of projects,” said Blais. “At the end of the day this is going to get approved or rejected at Queens Park in Toronto.”

(informations – français)

Depuis dimanche matin, quand vous vous rendez à Ottawa par la 417, vous pouvez apercevoir une grande bannière entre les sorties Boundary Road et Vars qui indique clairement l’état d’esprit de l’équipe de DTD2 et des résidents de Carlsbad Springs, Edwards et Vars (voir photo ci-jointe).

Le 25 juin dernier, Taggart-Miller présenta aux résidents de Carlsbad Springs, Edwards et Vars leur ébauche de l’étude environnementale pour un site d’enfouissement de 450 acres.  Ce site, qui sera quatre fois la grosseur de celui de Carp, acceptera des déchets industriels, commerciaux et institutionnels (IC&I) ainsi que ceux de construction et de démolition (C&D) incluant les sols contaminés – et non PAS les déchets recueillis aux résidences. 

Les membres du groupe « Dites Non au Dépotoir » cherchent toujours à comprendre pourquoi le ministère de l’environnement de l’Ontario envisagerait d’approuver un tel projet puisqu’il existe suffisamment de capacité présentement dans la région d’Ottawa.  On retrouvera sous peu, à proximité du site, deux centres de recyclage qui accepteront le même volume de déchets proposés par Taggart-Miller et qui absorberont l’excès dans des sites d’enfouissement existants.  Donc, aucune raison de créer  un nouveau dépotoir.  Ce que Taggart-Miller propose est loin d’être innovateur ou unique.

L’ironie de ce projet est que le terrain sur lequel on propose de bâtir ce site fut considéré et refusé à deux différents projets principalement à cause de la composition du sol – soit un sol d’argile mou, un terrain argileux et humide, qui rend ce terrain instable pour une grande structure lourde, comme un dépotoir.  Il devient particulièrement vulnérable lors des évènements sismiques, ce qui est un risque important dans cette partie de la province.  Ironiquement, ceci n’est pas un critère considéré par le ministère de l’environnement lors de la création de dépotoir. 

Les membres du groupe « Dites Non au Dépotoir » exerceront de nouvelles pressions auprès des  députés provinciaux soit Grant Crack, député de Glengarry-Prescott-Russell, comté où se retrouve le site proposé, Lisa MacLeod, député de Nepean-Carleton et de Marie-France Lalonde, député d’Ottawa-Orléans afin de sensibiliser l’honorable Glen R. Murray, ministre de l’environnement et des changements climatiques.

DÉPOTOIR PROPOSÉ PAR TAGGART-MILLER

Le 25 juin dernier, Taggart-Miller présenta aux résidents de Carlsbad Springs, Edwards et Vars leur ébauche de l’étude environnementale pour un site d’enfouissement de 450 acres.  Ce site, qui sera quatre fois la grosseur de celui de Carp, acceptera des déchets industriels, commerciaux et institutionnels (IC&I) ainsi que ceux de construction et de démolition (C&D) incluant les sols contaminés – et non PAS les déchets recueillis aux résidences. 
 
Les membres du groupe « Dites Non au Dépotoir » cherchent toujours à comprendre pourquoi le ministère de l’environnement de l’Ontario envisagerait d’approuver un tel projet puisqu’il existe suffisamment de capacité présentement dans la région d’Ottawa.  On retrouvera sous peu, à proximité du site, deux centres de recyclage qui accepteront le même volume de déchets proposés par Taggart-Miller et qui absorberont l’excès dans des sites d’enfouissement existants.  Donc, aucune raison de créer un nouveau dépotoir.  Ce que Taggart-Miller propose est loin d’être innovateur ou unique.
 
L’ironie de ce projet est que le terrain sur lequel on propose de bâtir ce site fut considéré et refusé pour deux différents projets à cause de la composition du sol – soit un sol d’argile mou, un terrain argileux et humide, qui rend ce terrain instable pour une grande structure lourde, comme un dépotoir.  Il devient particulièrement vulnérable lors des évènements sismiques, ce qui est un risque important dans cette partie de la province. Un rapport produit en mai 2014 par le ministère provincial du Développement du Nord et des Mines indique qu’il existe une faille à proximité.  Ironiquement, ceci n’est pas un critère considéré par le ministère de l’environnement lors de la création de dépotoir.  
 
Les membres du groupe « Dites Non au Dépotoir » exerceront de nouvelles pressions auprès des députés provinciaux soit Grant Crack, député de Glengarry-Prescott-Russell, comté où se retrouve le site proposé, Lisa MacLeod, député de Nepean-Carleton et de Marie-France Lalonde, député d’Ottawa-Orléans afin de sensibiliser l’honorable Glen R. Murray, ministre de l’environnement et des changements climatiques.

DTD2 MEETINGS

Standing up to Taggart Miller is not the work of 22 keen people – it is the effort of ALL of us in our towns and neighbourhoods. Please come and get involved – every voice counts. In particular, we need people with legal (environmental) expertise, and volunteers to carry out fundraising work.

The ministry made a decision we don’t support, but at least the waiting is done and we know what to do next. We hope everyone enjoys the holidays and we’ll see you in the New Year!

Proposed site:

site